Some Tips for Packing And Moving

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Some Tips for Packing And Moving

Some hacks are borrowed from the pros and some I figured out on my own after my many, many moves not to mention, lots of trial and error. Either way, now some of them are yours.

It was imperative that I fit everything perfectly since we’d be leaving after the rest of our things were being picked up by montrealmovers. If something didn’t fit, it would have to be left behind.

Here are some of my best go-to packing and moving hacks to try out for your next move.

1. MASTER THE RUSSIAN DOLL TECHNIQUE

This is one of my favorite packing and moving tips, and I’ve been using it for years. Similar to the setup of a Russian doll, you just put small packed boxes inside larger moving boxes. I like to use this method when packing items like pens and random things I’ve accumulated in my desk, all the different cooking utensils and gadgets in the kitchen, and any miscellaneous items like shelf decor or knick-knacks. This technique will help all your smaller items stay organized while also saving space — and every inch counts when you’re moving.

2. FORGET THE BUBBLE CUSHIONING ROLL AND USE YOUR CLOTHES AND LINENS INSTEAD

Bubble cushioning roll….who needs it? I’ve been wrapping my fragile items in my own clothes, linens, and towels for years. It knocks out two birds with one stone — it’s a convenient way to protect your stuff and pack your clothes. Consider wrapping framed artwork in layers of sheets and towels and stuffing delicate trinkets inside socks. You can then stuff those socks inside your sneakers for extra protection. Roll lamps with dresses, wrap mugs and drinking glasses in T-shirts, use blankets and duvets to protect small furniture, and commission random clothes to fill and secure otherwise empty space in boxes.

3. LABEL YOUR MOVING BOXES IN DETAIL, ON SEVERAL SIDES

Details make all the difference, especially if you’re keeping things in storage for a while. No matter how annoying or unnecessary it seems at the time, I always make sure to be extremely detailed when I’m labeling my moving boxes.

List out everything inside, particularly items that you know you’ll want to unpack ASAP. This makes it easier when it comes time to unpack — you’ll know exactly where to find what just by looking at the box. On that note, be sure to write down the contents on the top and at least two different sides of the box so that you can easily see what’s in the box — even if it’s stacked or lost in a pile of moving boxes. Artwork shipping company is dedicated to providing you with a service that you can trust.

4. MARK MOVING BOXES WITH SHORTHAND OR SYMBOLS

This hack saves time on both ends of your move — packing and unpacking. If you haven’t figured it out, I love to mark up my boxes. However, it can get monotonous to write the same things over and over, so I streamline the process by using symbols and shorthand. For example, instead of writing “fragile” on every box with breakables, I’ll mark several sides with a big “F” with a circle around it. I also use shorthand for locations, e.g., if I’m packing a box of living room stuff, I’ll just write “LR.” Other easy-to-identify options include using color-coded stickers or different color markers.

5. USE HANGERS TO FILL SPACE AND MAKE STURDIER BOXES

Hangers are one of those things that you don’t think much about until it’s time to pack them. They just seem to take up so much space, but at the same time you don’t want to just leave them behind because you’ll need them as soon as you unpack your clothes. My solution? Use them while you pack to help give extra support to your boxes.

No matter how well I think I’m packing, inevitably there are always a few boxes (or a lot of boxes) with a bit of space to spare at the top. Leaving extra space in your box will leave the box less structurally sound and more likely to collapse if other moving boxes are placed on top. This is where the hangers come in — toss a few on top and you’ll help add some solid support.

6. TIGHT SQUEEZE? MOCK UP YOUR MOVING SPACE

If you’re working with a small space, creating a mock version of the moving or storage space you’re working with is a great way to find out if everything will fit. This hack works best for car cargo and smaller storage spaces. There are three ways to go about it:

  1. Mark the dimensions of the space on your floor and wall with painter’s or masking tape (best for smaller spaces and if you’ve mainly got boxes).
  2. Create a scale version of the space and your larger items on graph paper.
  3. Use an online moving and storage calculator to double-check what will fit in your truck, moving container, or storage unit.

I used the mark-up method most recently as I tried to work out how best to pack the cargo area of my used SUV for my move across the country.